Anthony Weiner’s Do-it-Yourself Media Strategy

Anthony Weiner is out of public life but he’s still the subject of late night comedy one-liners. It’s a shame. He was building a public persona with a strong, distinctive voice and it’s a loss to the public conversation.

I’ve left it to others to fathom the psychology of his self-inflicted downfall. But in a more practical vein, his do-it-yourself media management will become a case study in how not to do it. His press conferences went so badly that even as I found his behavior totally unacceptable, I had to feel sorry for his public humiliation. Had he been guided through a media strategy that was more carefully developed, he could have saved himself and his family some of the embarrassment, and perhaps saved his career.

Weiner’s media management was terrible. He was never really in control of his own story, and he lied from the outset, inviting further scrutiny. Any media-savvy person would have told him this is the worst possible course. He invited the media and his detractors to dig deeper with his vague answers and waffling from the get-go.

He might have avoided his forced resignation by admitting his indiscretions at the outset, apologizing and entering himself into therapy. More than a few celebrities have followed this course and emerged to reclaim their reputation and rebuild their public image. Some of his political colleagues have survived even worse offenses by following this path.

Weiner chose to play out his apologies and resignation in full public view, apparently with no backup. He didn’t even control his own news conferences, giving his worst detractors a platform to heap insult on injury. Not once, but twice.

Media management is not rocket science but it does require strategy and training. In the media environment today doing less than thinking and acting strategically when dealing with media is equivalent to stepping in front of a moving bus and hoping the driver will see you and stop before flattening you. Weiner got flattened.

He had an even steeper hill to climb because his indiscretion involved images that were all over the Internet. His first lie–that his Twitter account was hacked–was improbable and left us scratching our heads. His refusal to deny that the photos were actually of him raised the level of skepticism. He lost control of his own story almost immediately and when he finally owned up to his behavior he was already out of options. He had to tell the truth.

The first thing any media consultant would have advised is to be truthful from the beginning. Admit to having a problem, apologize for the harm caused and tell how you are seeking to rectify the situation. He would still have been embarrassed, but he had a much better chance to frame the story and limit the damage. Instead, he invited wild speculation and humiliating questions.

If this episode has any redeeming value, it may be to remind us that crisis communications management is not a do-it-yourself project. It requires both skills and a set of actions that are based on the firm foundation of truthfulness and responsibility. You can’t wing it. And you shouldn’t lie.

You have to anticipate how to manage crises before they happen and keep a plan at the ready to implement when they do.

In this case, however, it’s pretty simple; don’t post lewd photos of yourself on the Internet and not expect to get caught.

(A similar perspective from a public relations writer at PR On The Run.)

Weiner: You can’t put the tweet back in the bird

Rep. Anthony Weiner learned the hard way that you can’t put the tweet back in the bird. Media guru Shel Holtz used this phrase when he spoke to the staff of United Methodist Communications a couple of years ago, and it’s been proven time and again.

Setting aside the obvious celebrity syndrome, narcissism and “what was he thinking?”  questions, there are important media lessons to be learned from Rep. Weiner’s downfall.

First, know the technology. Social media provides us the feel of the personal and local. But it’s neither. Every post is not only public. Once online, it’s available to a world of viewers and it’s archived for all time. Scrubbing past indiscretions is extremely difficult and all but impossible for most of us. Rep. Weiner’s attempt to delete a Twitter message was as naive as it was futile.

Second, social media require a strategy. Because they’re a powerful communications tool, using these media casually without thinking through why you’re using them is like jumping into a race car and speeding off without knowing how to drive it. A crash is very likely. Weiner  obviously did not consider how his Twitter use could affect his career. He had no strategy.

Some use social media to stay in touch with a small group of friends. Some use it to share information of interest to a target audience. Others create conversation by being provocative, and some advocate for their causes and build networks of like-minded believers. It’s important to know why you’re using social media and to stick to the strategy, or at least to think through a new strategy if you decide to change.

Third, there is no local anymore. Social media contain an oxymoron. If you communicate well locally, you will likely be successful, but no communication on the web is local. It’s global. A private message to a friend can be sent around the world with a keystroke.

Fourth, social media are personally empowering but not private. Some users are comfortable revealing personal details (albeit not as personal as Rep. Weiner, I hope). But these details are not private once they’re on a Facebook page or a service such as Twitter. We should not be misled by the feel of the personal when we use these media. We’re potentially communicating to a vast audience, some of whom are not necessarily friends.

This is another oxymoron. While they empower us to reach out beyond our immediate geographic community, they can also bring us down because they’re transparent. They can expose our inconsistencies and hypocrisies. This built-in quality of transparency  demands consistency, if not authenticity. If we make false claims or behave in ways inconsistent with values we have espoused, somewhere, somehow, someone will expose the falsehood or inconsistency.

Rep. Weiner seems to have stumbled not only ethically but also in his use of media. And now we refer to him as former Rep. Weiner.

10 Tips for Christians in Social Media

There are thousands of Christians participating in Twitter, YouTube, Facebook and more.  Whether we are posting to our own blog, tweeting or commenting on what someone else has written, it is important to remember a few guidelines about Christian conduct online.

1)      Remember the Golden Rule. Stick to the high road. Snarkiness abounds on the Internet, especially in chat forums and comment sections.

Lewis Carroll's Snark caused people to disappear, much like mean spirited jabs can diminish a person. Set yourself apart by keeping a positive tone, focusing your arguments on ideas rather than personal attacks.

2)      Let your faith emerge naturally in your posts, and avoid proselytizing.

3)      Don’t be holier than thou! Be thoughtful and opinionated, but avoid taking on a judgmental tone in your posts.

4)      Cut others some slack. Give people with whom you disagree the benefit of the doubt.

5)      Know your stuff. That is, know the ground on which you stand. Understand the values and theology that inform your views and consider how to express them.

6)      Be real. Being authentic is more important than appearing to be a flawless, model Christian. Most people cannot relate to perfection, and it’s easier to empathize with someone who is genuine about who they are.

7)      Engage a broad audience. Don’t limit yourself to interacting only with other Christians. Choose topics that spark the interest of “regular” people.

8)       Get out of the pulpit. Avoid churchy jargon and explain the concepts that you use. Don’t take for granted that people know anything about Christianity or are familiar with Jesus.  And be sure to keep it short.  Long, verbose diatribes do not entice reading.

9)      Don’t bring me down! Taking a cue from Paul’s first letter to Corinthians, post content that contributes to building up (faith) rather than tearing down.

10)   Use multimedia – video, audio, photo slideshows – to engage your audience more powerfully in the message or story you are trying to tell. Blogging about a soup kitchen or health care ministry? Include a 1- to 2-minute video clip with testimony from people benefiting from the program or people working with


Renewing the Church: The Leading Causes of Life or the Tsunami of Death?

My favorite phrase is “the leading causes of life.” It was conceived by Gary Gunderson and Larry Pray, and I’ve written about it several times. Gary is Senior V.P. for Health and Welfare and Director of the Center for Excellence in Faith and Health of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare in Memphis.  Larry is a pastor in the United Church of Christ and Senior Pastoral Scholar for Methodist LeBonheur Healthcare. They co-authored the book, Leading Causes of Life.

Their phrase endures, for me.

But another phrase is making the rounds in conversations in the denomination in which I labor: the “Death Tsunami.” It’s intended to describe the impending demographic change that will happen over the next several years as older members pass away.

It’s meant to be prophetic. Behind it is the thought that if these older members are not replaced with a younger group the days of the denomination itself are numbered.


I’ve been bouncing these two phrases around in my head, asking which excites me, gets my creative juices flowing, makes me want to get involved in making things better?

Guess which one does it for me?

I know the death phrase is meant to attract attention to a real problem. But it frames the future in such an inexorable way I just can’t get a handle on how to respond to it. As Gunderson and Pray write, “If death defines our efforts, then it will win every time.”

Hearing this, I want to start singing Joe Diffie’s country music song, “Prop Me Up Beside the Jukebox (If I die).” That’s about all the energy I can get for this framing of our collective future.

On the other hand, I can get energized about looking for the leading causes of life. It makes me want to search out those places and people who are creating, causing change, moving forward. It’s energizing to seek out what gives us life, makes it purposeful, gives it meaning. We are on a journey toward life.

For too long the mainline denominations have wallowed in their narrative of death. They’ve come to believe it, and they’ve allowed others to confirm it. Well, I don’t.

I believe we belong to each other and to God. This is the essence of our connection. In my denomination this means that the local church, annual conference and general church have the capacity to do more together than any of us can do alone. This gives us the capacity to transform the world for the better if we claim it and live it.

And that leads us to what Gunderson and Pray call coherence. Coherence is that web of blessing that defines our roles as human beings. It calls us beyond ourselves to become involved with others. It gives us life, they write. We are not alone and all about ourselves. We’re in this together.

In a world of rampant narcissism, the Christian faith calls us to become servants to those most vulnerable, in need and without voice. How counter-cultural is that?

And that call leads us out of helplessness and despair to agency. We can change and create change. We are not the inevitable victims of the tsunami of death. We are the agents who can bring, with God’s help, new life, new meaning, new purpose and hope to the dry, arid places that seem without the refreshing waters of renewal and healing.

And when we act in this way–moving toward life and toward others–we are blessed and we become a blessing. We sense that we are accountable to those who have come before, those who will follow and those with whom we share the invigorating journey called life.

So, like Joe Diffie, “I wanna go to heaven but I don’t wanna go tonight.” And “I ain’t afraid of dying, it’s the thought of being dead” that perplexes me. So I’m not giving in to the tsunami of death talk.

Instead, I’m looking for life through connection, coherence, agency and blessing, and I see these at work in the stories of this denomination everyday.

Let’s seek the leading causes of life.


The Long Journey of Indian Monsooned Malabar

I roasted a small batch of Indian Monsooned Malabar coffee beans this afternoon. I love that name.

As I’ve written before, I’m not an afficionado. I’m a rank amateur hobbyist. But this bean is one reason I enjoy home roasting.  It lets my imagination run wild. In researching the name, I found that the method for aging these beans is a story in itself.

The beans are picked at maturity and shipped to the Malabar region of southern India where they are dried and exposed to the monsoon winds along the coast.  Various web sources report the coffee originally shipped from Malabar ports to Europe under sail. In the dank, wooden hulls of ships traversing the Cape of Good Hope, the beans were exposed to salty, humid sea air that caused swelling and changed their characteristics.

Green coffee beans left, Indian Monsooned Malabar right.

Green coffee beans left, Indian Monsooned Malabar right.

During the weeks-long journey they turned pale, lost acidity and developed a mild, musty flavor when roasted. Europeans took to it.
With the construction of the Suez Canal and steamships, the beans arrived in Europe faster but lacked the transformation that occurred during the slower voyage. The Europeans didn’t like it.
To capture the original taste today, the beans are transported to the Malabar region where they are stored until the monsoon season and then spread onto warehouse floors or tables and allowed to dry in the humid monsoon air for several weeks.  They are raked or turned by hand during this period to expose them uniformly and prevent spoilage. This reproduces the transformation of the old sea voyage.
The result is a distinctive flavor that, apparently, you either love or hate. I’m in the love group.

Rwanda Bourbon green coffee bean left Indian Monsooned Malabar right.

It’s called musty, but that carries an unfortunate negative connotation, I think. It’s a mild, unique flavor, not sweet, not acidic. That’s as far as I can go.

But in my mind, I’m standing at the southern tip of Africa, watching the penguins on shore and peering into the distant horizon where a three-masted sailing ship is buffeted by the high seas. It’s making the turn westward, a load of bagged coffee beans in her hull.

In a few months, the rich aroma of roasted Malabar beans will fill the air of a London coffee house where friends have gathered for conversation and businessmen are making deals over cups of fresh, hot coffee. They sip unaware of the labor of the long, dangerous journey that has brought them this simple pleasure.

2000 Churches, Two Days, One Goal to Change the World

This is a post that was featured on Huffington Post on May 11 describing the UMC Change the World Weekend. There were some 2,000 churches and countless volunteers that participated in an amazing two-day weekend May 14-15,  where the goal was just one thing – to make the world a little better for others around us.

There’s a free gas giveaway, a yard sale where everything is free, and a spa day for single moms with no-cost manicures, massages and giveaways. There are free cookies, free bikes, free breakfast, and free car washes. One church will stuff a car with food for the hungry and homeless. Community gardens will be planted, homes will be repaired, money will be raised to build wells and fight malaria.

This weekend, May 14-15, is Change the World weekend, a time when thousands of United Methodists will team up to make the world a better place.

Some of the events are new endeavors. Some are one-time projects. Some are ongoing ministries that have been scheduled to coincide with Change the World. They go by many names — “Spring into Grace,” “Fixin’ it for Christ,” “Feed Our Neighbors,” “Day of Caring” — but all have a common purpose. It’s all about helping our brothers and sisters, whether they are around the corner or around the world.

The First United Methodist Church of Saline, Mich., is changing the world for children in Zimbabwe by collecting used children’s book to start two new libraries at primary schools there. Their goal is to fill a 20-foot shipping container with books — about 500 boxes. Books are coming in from as far away as South Dakota and Ohio. The $8,000 cost for shipping the books will be provided by Morris and Ann Taber, retired mission volunteers who sent similar containers three times previously. The Rev. Laura Speiran said:

“In explaining it to the congregation, I emphasized that it is not just about collecting books (and changing the world for children in Zimbabwe); it is also about inviting people in our own community to become engaged with the church even if they have never been engaged before — that it is about planting seeds, about the love of God being big enough and powerful enough to include them. … We, as United Methodists, are all about changing the world, but through making disciples for Jesus Christ, not just doing good works.”

One event that is an ongoing ministry is a free vision clinic hosted by Oak Forest United Methodist Church in Little Rock, a church of only about 70 members that also has a medical and dental clinic. Inspired by Bartimaeus, the blind beggar who regained his sight when he was healed by Jesus, “Bart’s Clinic” provides free eye exams and eyeglasses for the working poor — people who have no Medicare or Medicaid.

Though it’s been open less than two months and operates just one day a week, the clinic has already managed to change the world for some individuals. Consider the 20-year-old girl who lost her glasses when she was only 10. Unable to replace them, she simply did without glasses. There’s the 5-year-old boy who was able to get glasses before getting behind in school. There have been two cases of glaucoma detected, which untreated would have led to blindness.

The clinic is staffed by medical volunteers and church members who take care of the administrative work of setting appointments and making reminder calls. One of the volunteers is 82 years old.

One’s age, in fact, seems to not be a factor when it comes to changing the world. The congregation at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Beaumont, Texas, where the average age is about 80, is excited about participating in Change the World. They will host a shower for a nearby urban mission. Mandarin United Methodist Church in Jacksonville, Fla., says they will have projects designed for volunteers ages 2 to 99; and at First United Methodist Church in Tempe, Ariz., the youth group will host a nail salon for homeless men and women.

The real power of Change the World is that having all the events on one weekend demonstrates the impact of what we can achieve together. Think what could be accomplished if everyone spent an occasional weekend helping a neighbor or volunteering our time.

Undergirding these activities is not just about providing social services. It’s about reflecting the call of Jesus as recorded in Matthew 25 to serve the needs of the poor, the ill and those who are oppressed as an expression of faithfulness to him. To follow Jesus is to be a servant who seeks to change the world.


“Fear is not the only force at work in the world today”

In the aftermath of the tragedy of 9/11, when the United States and the world were grieving, mainline denominations called for prayer, inclusion and reconciliation. In an ad near Ground Zero, The United Methodist Church proclaimed, “Fear is not the only force at work in the world.”

When the South Asian tsunami brought massive death and destruction to the people of the Asian Rim, the mainline voices said that it was not the work of a vengeful God. Instead, they said, God was in the suffering, standing with those experiencing great loss. The churches called on the world to assist, and people around the world did exactly that.

The voice of these denominations helps to shape public perceptions not only of themselves as denominations but also of God and the nature of religious faith. It is an important role in a world of harsh, extreme voices of exclusion and hate.

Yet, communication in most organizations is viewed as a back-office service function. When budgets are tight in nonprofits, especially religious groups, the first cuts are in the communications staff and their budgets.

For as long as they have been making these cuts, mainline Protestant denominations have been in decline, but they have not made the correlation that reducing communications capacity equates with abetting decline and losing their voice in the public conversation.

I frequently make this point when I speak to groups, and I often see heads nodding in agreement. But the reduction in communication capacity continues nevertheless.

Communications functions today are strategic assets, not back-office functions. The world is engaged in multiple conversations, and if the old-line religious organizations are not engaged as well, they become irrelevant. We know this, but somehow we tend to remain mostly on the sidelines.

The new media environment has undermined the old authority structures that allowed for a more definitive word to be spoken by religious denominations. Those messages could be pushed out. But the new environment is a conversation. The audience is not passively waiting to hear the word. The conversation takes it own direction, often framed by those with a self-serving agenda and ideology.

To the degree that they are aggressive and capture attention, they shape the conversation and move it forward. This is why I often make the point that communication is a strategic asset. The ability to frame the conversation in order to shape how society addresses the most important issues it faces requires more thought than merely assembling collateral materials, getting page views on a website or amassing Twitter followers.

It requires having a clear, engaging message with which to encourage interaction and conversation. The mainline voice needs to be heard because historically, in its various expressions, it has been a voice for justice for the powerless and vulnerable. It has been a voice for an inclusive community. And it has stood for humane values in a dehumanizing, isolating culture.

This voice is needed, but it won’t be heard without more careful strategic thought and adequate staff and resources to project it into the global conversation. I continue to make the claim that the voice of the mainline denominations is needed because it is a humanizing, reconciling and clear voice for peace, justice and a more holistic and humane global society.

Communications – our voice in the world – should be the last ministry that mainline denominations consider for reduction.

Celebrating the Death of Osama bin Laden?

FBI Updates Most Wanted Terrorist List

Upon hearing of the death of Osama bin Laden, the Rev. Ken Ehrman of Minnesota sent an email blast to members of his local church inviting them to come that evening to discuss how they felt about it.


Given such short notice, he had no idea how many might respond, but 20 people came. They discussed the ambivalence a lot of us are feeling at the awkward celebration of the death of another human, even one so infamous as bin Laden.

Beyond a remarkable testament to Rev. Ehrman’s pastoral leadership, I think his act also points to something I felt need of but was missing in my own reaction to this news–a way to process my feelings, to deal with great uneasiness.

There is something that says I should not be dancing and singing in the street in the face of loss of life. The whole of the Christian story is about renewed, redeemed and restored life.

Bin Laden’s actions and words were utterly evil. He was an instrument of death. He spoke for death. And this is an offense to all that is decent and good and uplifting. It stands in stark contrast to all that we hope for and believe we should pursue as people who follow one who said, “I am come that you may have life and may live abundantly.”

There are some who will contend that in killing bin Laden, redemption is completed. And others will make the case that vengeance is justified. Many will make a biblical case for it.

But there is that lingering, haunting passage of scripture in which Jesus tells Peter to keep his sword sheathed when the soldiers come for him. His way is not to exact vengeance nor to live by the sword. But to lead toward life.

What, then are we to make of our ambivalent feelings? And how do we come to grips with them?

I think Rev. Ehrman got it right. We come together as a community of faith. We pray. We share honestly and openly our humanity, our doubts, our fears, our frustrations, and we lay them before God. We ask for strength and wisdom. We seek to support each other. We seek understanding. And we seek to learn more about The Way, as the early Christian path was known.

I think a faithful response is reflective and prayerful. Humble. Life seeking. For we have within us the same passions and hubris that can lead us to take as well as give life. And this capacity should make us very humble and cautious of our driving emotions.

Above all, unlike bin Laden, I believe as followers of Jesus we must seek the leading causes of life, a phrase my friend Gary Gunderson has popularized, lest we behave with the same disregard for the sacredness of life that we so deeply and strongly reject.

The Buddha Was Wearing a Rolex

The Buddha was wearing a Rolex. He was filling my room. Expanding slowly but steadily. I could not get my breath, and I felt as if he were suffocating me.

I was in a hotel room in Cambodia shortly after the Pol Pot regime had fallen and Vietnam had invaded. I had read a story in National Geographic prior to travel in which a Buddha in the ancient city of  Angkor Wat had been defaced by someone who scratched a crude image of a Rolex watch on his wrist. I’ve never actually seen this Buddha, but the image stuck in my subconscious.

A couple of days earlier, our film crew had stood at the edge of a killing field, the mass graves of victims of Pol Pot’s murderous reign, as a worker unearthed human remains and counted skulls. The grass was ankle high, and I was eaten up with mosquito bites.

I had contracted malaria.
I recall awakening throughout the night feeling hot. I lay on the tiled floor of my hotel room because it felt cool to my cheek. In the morning my colleagues got me to a health clinic run by a humanitarian organization, and I was given medications that soon brought me back to a more normal state. The Buddha left. But I’ve never forgotten him.

I was fortunate. My co-workers recognized the signs of malaria and got me to medical care quickly. The medications and a skilled physician were available. Unlike the circumstances that confront millions of people sick with malaria on the African continent, neither cost nor travel were barriers to getting treatment.

Many of those who deal with the disease, particularly mothers, don’t know what causes malaria. They have no access to medicines or health services. Lacking knowledge, they act too slowly, if at all, and their loved ones die. Others seek out herbal healers who proffer remedies that risk damaging the kidneys or livers of the sick.

Bishop Nkulu Ntanda Ntambo says in the documentary, “A Killer in the Dark,” the deaths that result from this lack of knowledge are so common that his family simply considered the rainy season the season of death. The family, living in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, moved from one village to another when death struck.

But “A Killer in the Dark” also shows how community health workers who train families to use bed nets, clean up their environment and reduce standing water can stem the progress of this disease.

It also shows how the disease can be overcome as it was during the construction of the Panama Canal. The French abandoned the canal due to the toll of malaria on workers. When research finally connected the disease to infected mosquitoes, abatement measures were carried out that allowed workers to complete the canal.

The effort to combat this disease is continuing, and the documentary shows how the efforts of faith-based groups are making a vital contribution to reducing its deadly toll.

Moreover, the methods they use empower whole communities to act so they can enhance and improve community life. No more will these communities accept with resignation that malaria deaths are a natural part of the changing seasons, a part of the cycle of life and death over which they have no control. It is possible to imagine no malaria.  And to make it so.

Pauley Perrette, of NCIS fame, provides the narration for the United Methodist upcoming TV special called “A Killer in the Dark: An Extraordinary Effort to Combat Malaria.” The program, which will air on many NBC affiliates May 1 (check local listings), documents the daily struggle in Africa against malaria and highlights the work of Imagine No Malaria to wipe out a devastating disease that’s killing 2,000 people every single day. The program is presented by the National Council of Churches under the auspices of the Interfaith Broadcasting Commission and is produced by United Methodist Communication.


Storytellers on the Front Lines

As I lay on the hood of a Land Rover, propped against the windshield and gazing into the marvelous night sky above Luuq, Somalia, I heard a swooshing sound followed by an explosion that shook the earth. My reverie was quickly broken.

My friend, cinematographer Burton Buller, came out of a tent and exclaimed, “They’re shooting at us!”

They weren’t shooting at us, and he was joking, but they were shooting over us at a bridge not far away.

We were in a refugee camp situated between opposing Somali forces in the Ogaden rangelands, documenting conditions the world cared little about and would as soon ignore.

I thought of this as I considered the deaths of British photojournalist Tim Hetherington and Getty photographer Chris Hondros in a mortar attack in Libya yesterday. Two other journalists were injured.

Getting the story, even under circumstances that are life-threatening, is a driving force for many journalists. They are drawn to the power of storytelling, the conviction that the world must know what is happening, especially in places where life hangs in the balance.

They have an unexpressed desire to make a difference, especially for those who lack the means to tell their own story. They enable others to speak of their experiences, hoping that perhaps the world will care, the policymakers will work for change, the guns will be silenced and the people freed to pursue their lives.

We need the storytellers. They remind us of both our capacity for inhumanity as well as our capacity for human decency. They hold before us the mirror of our humanity. And in doing so they remind us of our worst, and best, perhaps, in the unexpressed hope that by knowing each other more deeply and fully, we can become more truthful, just and dignified. We can become the people we say we want to be when we are at our best.

But to tell this story they must be in harm’s way, for it is in these places, places of extremes, that the drama is played out graphically and with the risk of ultimate resolution – where life or death weigh in the balance.

The Committee to Protect Journalists says 16 journalists have died this year – 44 in 2010. Journalists are under attack in Libya. Throughout the Middle East Spring, they have been among those who pay the price for the wrenching changes that are being pressed on authoritarian, corrupt regimes.

Yet they continue to tell the stories. They continue to remind us who we are and who we aspire to be. Let us pray for them all and be thankful they are reaching out to us, holding up the mirror of reality, and sometimes making the ultimate sacrifice that we may see and know, and care.



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