Archive - September, 2014

A new front in the Ebola crisis

United Methodist Bishop John K. Yambasu, chairman of the religious leaders task force, demonstrates to participants a new way of greeting instead of the traditional handshake. New traditions are being created to help prevent the spread of the Ebola virus. Photo by Phileas Jusu, UMNS.

Bishop John K. Yambasu, chairman of the Religious Leaders Task Force in Sierra Leone, demonstrates a safe way of greeting instead of the traditional handshake. Photo by Phileas Jusu, UMNS.

With the killing of a delegation of health officials, journalists and a pastor by a mob of rural villagers in Guinea, an even more tragic page has turned in the Ebola crisis.

The mission of the group was to dispel rumors about the outbreak, but the villagers thought they had come to spread the virus. The people attacked the group with rocks. Eight bodies were later found, bearing signs of having been attacked with machetes and clubs.

The event is a severe example of the irrational fears that are rife across the region. In Sierra Leone, the government’s Emergency Operations Center issued a release to dispel a rumor that soap to be distributed during the three-day lockdown, known locally as Ose to Ose Tok (House to House Talk), had been infected to spread the virus.

Fear drives these rumors. The immediate challenge is to arm trusted local people with accurate information to correct the inaccuracies and dispel the fear. The Ose to Ose Talk during the three-day lockdown in Sierra Leone is an example.

Correcting misinformation

In addition, commentaries on television, radio and in print by trusted leaders such as Bishop John Yambasu, the United Methodist leader in Sierra Leone, are helping to correct misinformation and encourage cooperation with health programs to halt the spread of the disease.

United Methodist Communications is providing text messages to clergy in rural areas as well as cities in Sierra Leone and Liberia. These messages are consistent with those developed by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control. The church’s advantage lies in its grassroots network of clergy and leaders who live in the affected regions and are trusted.

Two messages are sent daily. The morning message is usually about health practices. For example, these messages were sent this morning:

Community health workers are trained to help us all and are essential to beating Ebola. Please cooperate with them during the lockdown. – Bishop J. Yambasu (Sierra Leone)

In the Ebola crisis, handle animals with protective clothing. Thoroughly cook animal products (blood and meat) before eating. – Ad., WHO (Bishop J. Innis) (Liberia)

Each afternoon a message based on Scripture is sent. For example: Do not worry … in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.” (Philippians 4:6) – Bishop J. Innis or Bishop J. Yambasu

We are also distributing solar cellphone chargers to give these messengers a cost-free means of keeping their phones charged.

The long-term challenge 

This crisis underscores a truism: Poverty breeds social discontent and mistrust of unresponsive government. Liberians clearly do not trust their government. At the outset of the crisis, the rumor spread that the outbreak was false, created by the government to bring more foreign dollars into the country to pay corrupt government officials.

In the long term, the challenge is to provide education that leads to better understanding of disease and how to prevent infections. This will require effective public education. It is also necessary to build effective, accessible public health systems, and equally important to establish responsive, transparent governance.

Building public infrastructure that is common in societies in the global North, such as sanitary sewers, clean water, and Wi-Fi and mobile phone systems, is also  a long-term solution.

Addressing inequities 

Africa’s leaders must gain the trust of their citizens by ending corruption and conducting government affairs with transparency, and citizens must have access to the information they need to make responsible decisions. Access to information is a human right in this information rich age. It’s essential to good citizenship.

The stark realities of the Ebola crisis make clear the need for these basic changes. The world must stem the immediate crisis. But that is not enough. We must address the underlying deficits that periodically surface and remind us that inequities in the world make all of us less secure and threaten global well-being when systems break down.

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The Foundation for United Methodist Communications has established an emergency communications fund. With your help, we can provide communications support in the event of a crisis or disaster. Donate here.

Their problems are our problems

As the Ebola epidemic continues to spread amid warnings by Doctors Without Borders that it is out of control, Dr. Michael T. Osterholm writes that health professionals are not talking publicly about the potential for Ebola to mutate into an even more dangerous form by developing the ability for airborne transmission. This has not happened yet in humans, but he says controlled studies have confirmed respiratory transfer of the Ebola Zaire strain from pigs to monkeys.

In addition, Osterholm says Ebola Reston, a different strain, passed through air transmission in a study group of monkeys in 1989 and the animals were euthanized to contain the virus.

If the virus reaches the megacities of Africa, he says, the opportunity for mutation could lead to more dire consequences, endangering many more people. Even without this speculative possibility, one mapping model predicts the number of victims will far exceed WHO estimates and could take a year or more to contain.

The rising rate of infections and deaths is cause for more than words of concern. It’s a call to action.

Poverty must be addressed

The Ebola virus carries the disease, but the disease is transmitted by ignorance, mistrust and resistance to proper care by ill-informed people. Ebola gains its foothold in poor communities where lack of understanding of the virus and how it is transmitted is widespread.

It gains momentum because these communities lack basic health care services and medical staff. It roars forward where people do not trust the information they are given by government officials. This escalating pyramid results in a contagion that threatens communities, nations, and potentially, the world. The underlying culprit is poverty.

Obviously, the immediate crisis must be contained. But we cannot stop there.

We must address poverty in a systematic, comprehensive way. Too many people are still dying of malaria, HIV/AIDS and other diseases of poverty. This will require a more effective, coordinated approach than we’ve mustered so far. Small one-off projects and uncoordinated development efforts will not get at the problem of poverty.

We need to provide people with access to accurate information, better education, more effective, well-staffed and well-equipped health facilities, treatment and immunization that cover the entire population, clean water, sanitation systems and economic opportunity.

This requires global resources. We know this, but we don’t approach it holistically.

What we don’t talk about

This neighborhood in Bom Jesus, Angola, is representative of many communities in sub-Saharan Africa.

This neighborhood in Bom Jesus, Angola, is representative of many communities in sub-Saharan Africa. Photo by Mike DuBose, United Methodist Communications.

The poor have no constituency. Their voices go unheard. And yet, they are not invisible. Faith organizations have been working with poor people for decades, and within faith communities, poverty is seen for what it is, a dishonoring of the sacredness of the human spirit.

But faith organizations have been focused on limited goals and have admirably addressed human needs within this limited perspective. Today, however, the need is for a broader approach and advocates who seek to change public policy in addition to performing their own good works locally.

Before they head for their destination, every mission team should make it a priority to be briefed on the conditions that contribute to the poverty that afflicts those they go to serve. And they should commit to addressing those conditions upon their return by advocating for public policies to alleviate the root causes.

We need to see the social, economic and political context in which Ebola, malaria, HIV/AIDS and other diseases of poverty thrive. This is what we in faith communities don’t talk about.

Thinking – and acting – globally

Palliative measures will ease the immediate suffering, but they do not change the conditions that are at the root of human ignorance and suffering. These roots are structural and systemic. They result from poor governance, economic inequity, lack of empowered citizens and corporate responsibility.

We must build out the digital infrastructure that carries reliable, useful information, make it accessible to everyone and train people how to use it. This infrastructure has not only shrunk the world, it contains the store of the world’s knowledge, and everyone needs access to it.

We must change our thinking that diseases like Ebola, and those affected by it, are remote from us. We must foster a global understanding. We think of Ebola as thousands of miles across the ocean, but it’s all-too-clear today that it’s really only  a six-hour flight away.

Like it or not, we are global citizens, and “their problems” are our problems.

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The Foundation for United Methodist Communications has established an emergency communications fund. With your help, we can provide communications support in the event of a crisis or disaster. Donate here.