Responding to worst Ebola outbreak in history

In Sierra Leone, Phileas Jusu receives an  Ebola text message from Bishop John K. Yambasu using mobile technology. The message addresses both health and spiritual needs. (The entire message reads as follows: "This message is from United Methodist Communications on behalf of Bishop John K. Yambasu. Please save this number as UMC Alerts to identify future messages. As we struggle with Ebola, I pray that faith – not fear – will be our response. This is not the time for blame or denial. It is a time to respond in love.") Photo courtesy of Phileas Jusu

In Sierra Leone, Phileas Jusu receives an Ebola text message on behalf of Bishop John K. Yambasu using mobile technology. The message, sent by United Methodist Communications, addresses both health and spiritual needs. Photo courtesy of Phileas Jusu.

The cross-border Ebola epidemic continues to spread and claim lives. The World Health Organization said this morning that the death toll could reach 20,000, and the virus is reported to have surfaced outside Nigeria’s capital city.

A doctor in Port Harcourt, the center of international oil shipping from Nigeria, died of the virus. This means the virus was not contained in Lagos, the capital, as had been thought. It also raises concerns about containment in a region with international workers in the oil industry.

Another strain of the virus, unconnected to the West Africa outbreak, has surfaced in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Nigeria has closed its schools until October, and countries neighboring the affected nations have been advised to step up surveillance. Air France has joined the international carriers that have temporarily stopped service to Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea, complicating the challenge of getting supplies and health workers into the region.

In addition to the challenge of getting disinfectants, cleaning supplies, gloves, masks and related medical tools into the region, the mistrust of public health services and government announcements continues to contribute to the misinformation and disbelief that only exacerbates the spread of the virus.

United Methodist Communications is sending two text messages a day to networks of local contacts in Sierra Leone and Liberia with content approved by health officials. And the organization is inviting bishops and church leaders in other African nations to join in this information effort as they deem it necessary.

The messages can be read on conventional mobile phones, which the majority of Africans use. They are cost-free for the recipient, so they don’t add a financial burden to end-users. The messages are sent under the approval and sponsorship of bishops in the affected countries in the belief that local trusted leaders are more likely to be heard.

In addition to text messages, UMCom is exploring an audio message system to provide information to people who cannot read. It’s clear that communication serves a fundamental need in this crisis, and it’s essential to employ as many communication tools and strategies as possible to help get the contagion under control.


 

The Foundation for United Methodist Communications has established an emergency communications fund. With your help, we can provide communications support in the event of a crisis or disaster. Donate here.

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