Moving Forward and Looking Back–Transparent Communication

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A website contains the background papers for a discussion about offering the sacrament of Holy Communion online.

The year 2013 is in our rear view mirror. As we stand on the threshold of a new year, it’s useful to review past experiences and build on them.

We’re in an information age in which technology and communication are as important as they’ve ever been in shaping our lives. Over the next four days, I’ll take a look at events this past year and four big ways I think the intersection of technology and communication is shaping the church.

Transparency

In fall 2013, a churchwide theological conversation about whether Holy Communion should be administered online took place both virtually and amid a gathering of 27 scholars, bishops, laypersons, clergy and agency executives. The conversation followed a proposal from Central United Methodist Church in Concord, N.C., to launch an online campus that would potentially offer the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper.

The discussion stimulated a thoughtful and constructive dialogue during a 10-hour meeting that took place in Nashville, Tenn., while many people followed along on Facebook and Twitter. The discussion was archived on Storify. The background documents considered during the meeting were widely circulated and posted online.

Everything said was chronicled for public consumption via social media sites. The discussion became a trending topic on Twitter and even caught the attention of the Wall Street Journal. Social media provided a means for widening the conversation from an academic arena to one that was more about the life of the local church, as social media users reported on the dialogue in real-time so others could react and post their opinions.

The result of the expanded conversation was that it generated critical thinking and a means for education as well. People going into the conversation had some predisposition about whether the sacrament of communion online was good or bad, but those perceptions were somewhat influenced, at least to the extent that many were not quite as sure that the answer was black and white.

The group asked the Council of Bishops to call for a moratorium on the practice of online communion and to initiate a study on best practices for ministry through online means.

Further, the experience served as a model for how we might conduct church affairs publicly and accessibly, and opened the possibilities for wider and more transparent conversation about a variety of issues that are of concern to people today.

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