In South Sudan An Urgent Need for Change

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Wikimedia / Steve Evans. Creative Commons.

As I watched a video news story online this morning about the flight to safety of displaced people in southern Sudan I was struck by a paradox that seems irreconcilable.

The paradox is that the world is changing rapidly for some and for others it seems to never change.

As I watched the Sudan video, I could place myself on the land where the people were gathered, bone dry, dusty, littered with the remnants of plastic bags, the sunburned grass and weeds brown as a cardboard box and even more brittle.

Children sit on blankets on the ground, huddle over wood fires, and women cook in old dented, beat up pots perched on rocks, conditions  I’ve seen before. It seems little has changed despite the birth of a new nation and the opportunity to make great change.

A woman whose meager possessions include a plastic chair and a blue gallon bucket maneuvers in a large boat preparing to cross the river to relative safety. A little girl around nine or ten years of age watches the scene with a baby brother or sister perched on her hip. Women arrive carrying bundles on their heads.

The scene could as easily be Ethiopia in the 1980s, or Somalia, Liberia, Mozambique, or numerous other places across the continent over past decades. The faces, the stories and the conditions are the same.

In south Sudan, people barely surviving in their villages, many of them partisans of neither side, are caught between the guns. They are burned out, shot down, the women raped, and the children, babies and old folks lost in the chaos of an attack.

In the frenzy, the fearful flee into the bush and the vulnerable are left behind to fend for themselves, if they’re not murdered to make a grisly point–if there is a point to such mayhem–that the militia are all-powerful.

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Wikimedia / Steve Evans. Creative Commons.

I wonder how many times this depravity will be repeated, and why such evil seems to pass from one generation to the next and travel from one region to another with depressing consistency? And of course there is no easy answer.

I know that the hard, cold reality is that only Africans can change Africa. Sudanese religious leaders have spoken out against the tribal violence and called for international help.

Their plea is a call for change, and for those of us far removed by geography to be agents of change.

We can assist those who are  easing the plight of those affected, we can press governments and international agencies to seek justice for those left behind, vulnerable, abused, and exploited. We can act to bring change.

How does God’s love abide in anyone who has the world’s goods and sees a brother or sister in need and yet refuses help? Little children, let us love, not in word or speech, but in truth and action.” (1 John 3:17-18 NRSV)

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