Peering Into The Heart of the Universe

Last night, along with several others, I peered into a microscope at the Hillyer Lab at Vanderbilt University Medical School and looked at a mosquito’s heart. It was a transcendent experience.

We also watched two videos. In one, blood courses through a mosquito’s heart. In the other, we watched cells that will gestate and migrate to the salivary glands and become a malaria parasite.

The suffering this process will bring to humans is tragic. I never underestimate this. At the same time, I am awed by our ability to look at a mosquito’s heart! We can video it as it pumps! But there is more to transcendence than mere technology, and that is what grabs my imagination and won’t let go.

Later, I watched The Incredible Journey of the Butterflies, a Nova program on PBS about the migratory flight of Monarch butterflies. These delicate, beautiful creatures weighing less than a half ounce somehow manage to reproduce in a generational cycle that results in a migration of thousands of miles from Canada to Mexico. How they do it eludes us.

As a layperson utterly lacking scientific knowledge, this inspires me with wonderment at the processes of nature that happen in complex ways, sometimes beyond our sight and often beyond understanding. To me, they are mysteries and more. They inspire awe.

To experience awe and mystery is to stand at the threshold of transcendence. It’s to be transported beyond my puny conceptions about the mechanics of life and into wonderment about how it happens and what it means. It’s to peer at the mystery we call God.

The Creation with which we are entrusted is endlessly fascinating, even as we deal with such harmful processes as malaria and as we are called to steward Creation and protect all its creatures. As the universe unfolds its mysteries I am humbled by what I don’t know. I can only dimly glimpse its complexity and discover my place in it.

When such mysteries are unlocked they don’t necessarily put an end to the awe and wonder. As often as not, they lead to a gateway behind which lies more mystery, more inviting fascination. It’s as if the Creation is an unfolding drama and we’re but one of the actors searching for its plot line. We seek to know what lies beyond the beating heart of a mosquito and a malevolent parasite. We search to understand the flight of a lovely, fragile creature that leads us to flights of imagination, thoughts of beauty, and to wonder how it all fits together.

That’s what I experienced as I looked at the heart of the mosquito and watched the migration of the Monarchs. In the macro, viewing the mosquito’s heart was as if I were looking into the universe, beyond the remarkable precision of the structure, beyond the functional beauty of its mechanical pump, pump, pumping, and into a seamless reality that can only be apprehended because it is unfolding, beckoning inviting exploration.

Or consider the butterfly, its wings in macro are but scales refracting light at different frequencies, but seen in their wholeness they inspire in us a wondrous sense of beauty. So simple, yet so complex. They power a soaring flight so fanciful and perilous that were a human to embark upon it in such a spare way it would be considered insane.

In this wonder, we can celebrate with those of old, “Those who live at earth’s farthest bounds are awed by your signs; you make the gateways of the morning and the evening shout for joy.” (Psalm 65:8)

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