What do you live for? What would you die for?

“What are you willing to die for? Because you’re doing it right now.” Those fourteen words on Twitter set Dewitt Jones to thinking. Jones is one of the most creative photographer-writer-thinkers we are blessed with today.

Surprisingly, he said he had never really thought about it. And in giving it thought he comes to a belief that he’s a seeker of beauty. His photography demonstrates this in spades. He’s one who shares beauty. He decided to post a photo a day on his Facebook page with a commentary that reveals beauty.

Jones’ column in Outdoor Photographer led me to reflect on the same question. But I’ve considered this question many times before. What am I willing to die for? It’s occurred to me when I was gathering stories in places where circumstances were risky and the outcome wasn’t quite certain. I recall having to sign a release to climb aboard a UN flight into Mogadishu years ago. The release made clear the destination was unsafe, that I was aware of the risks, and I would not hold the UN accountable in any way in the event of my death. That focuses your mind rather clearly.

As we landed and prepared to depart the plane, a guy from Oklahoma working for the U.S. government put on a flak jacket. More focus.

My takeaway from Jones’ wonderful column is that there are things we live for and things we’re prepared to die for. And it’s good to know what they are.

I’ve always told myself in dicey situations that I’d rather die telling a good story than from a heart attack while waiting in line for a Big Mac.

Storytelling is a act of faith. It’s an attempt to connect, to bridge the distance that sometimes causes us to forget that we’re all in this world together, and that we have more in common than we realize.

When we discover our shared humanity we understand life differently. If we are wise, we see other perspectives and understand both our differences as well as our similarities. We discover our shared humanity.

Annette Simmons writes that a good story simplifies our world into something that we feel like we can understand.

To live in this world we must find meaning and purpose. Stories help us to discover who we are in relationship to others, what is important and what gives us meaning. From this we can find our purpose and seek to live more fruitfully.

For Jones it’s finding, capturing and sharing beauty daily. For some of us, it’s telling stories. For others, it’s a myriad of interesting, exciting and challenging pursuits. And the answer doesn’t have to be found faraway, it’s as close as we wish to pursue in our daily lives right where we are.

For me an exciting paradox lies in the question, “What are you willing to die for?” The paradox is this: when we discover what we’re willing to die for, we also discover what we’re willing to live for.

Thank goodness for beauty and for stories that guide us on the journey.

What are you willing to die for? What are you living for? These are wonderful, fascinating and exciting questions to pursue. And thank you Mr. Jones for putting them before us.

4 Responses to “What do you live for? What would you die for?”

  1. Rich Buckley November 30, 2011 at 4:15 pm #

    Whatever it would be, by the time I got their I would likely be a coward and try and find a way out.

  2. Russ December 2, 2011 at 10:58 am #

    My kids. No hesitation.

  3. Isabel Gomez June 9, 2012 at 12:57 am #

    Also at what age ? In your 40′ s you might still be looking for somethig to die for. At my age ( 75 ) You just want to stay alive.

  4. Kim Shockley July 16, 2012 at 2:37 pm #

    Many years ago my father found a statement made in a photography magazine by Dewitt Jones that also had significant impact on our family: “Great peace lies at the center of personal insignificance.” How interesting that he is still sharing such profound and life-changing ideas!

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