Entering A New Age Of Faith

Do we stand at the dawn of the Age of the Spirit, as theologian Harvey Cox writes in “The Future of Faith,” or the end of the religious era, as Bob Roberts Jr. writes in “Glocalization: How Followers of Jesus Engage a Flattened World”?

Harvey Cox

Cox believes the world is becoming more religious, not less, and that faith is being reclaimed as a way of living and acting in the world as we stand before the mystery of God. Roberts writes the future of the church will be the story of the non-religious follower of Jesus, as I reported in a previous post.

These two views are not as incompatible as they seem at first glance, nor are they unique. Shane Hipps takes a similar tack in “The Hidden Power of Electronic Culture,” and Tex Sample makes the case that faith is best communicated among working class people as practice and not as belief (“Blue Collar Resistance and the Politics of Jesus,” Abingdon Press).

This points to the ferment stirring in religious communities worldwide. It’s ferment about how faith is defined, its place in the world and how faithful people express it.

As we move toward global interconnectedness and a mediated culture that is image-based, viral and relies on stories, it looks more like the oral culture of Jesus than not. The paradox is that technology gives us the ability to communicate directly and to tell our stories broadly.

Trust vs. belief

Cox reminds us the earliest followers of Jesus were said to follow “The Way” (Acts. 9:2). Faith, Cox says, meant a dynamic lifestyle nurtured in communities guided by men and women that reflected hope for God’s coming reign.

The earliest Christians affirmed that “Jesus is Lord.” To follow him meant to do as he said in Matthew 25: feed the hungry, clothe the naked, care for the sick, visit the prisoner, give drink to the thirsty.

In the long chain of history, however, Cox says this dynamic view of faith got changed.Trust in Jesus became belief about Jesus, Cox writes.

Trusting in Jesus, however, meant recognizing the kingdom of God that he proclaimed is here and now. It meant the world has unrealized potential and the faithful are called to help fulfill this potential even in the face of setbacks and death itself. It is a commitment to hope. Both Roberts and Cox end with this hope. It is the foundation for faithful living.

‘A God-sized challenge’

Faith is best expressed in community—something each of the writers I’ve cited also makes clear. Jesus used the poetry of Isaiah to explain his call to his followers to be outward-bound people acting in ways that not only usher in the kingdom of God but also affirm its reality here and now.They are called to be servant people who affirm the reign of God.

This is a challenge in a globally interconnected world. How do we live our faith locally and globally? As I read these writings about faith as practice, I’m left with a root question: How do we seek justice locally and globally? Cox admits it’s an unresolved question. Roberts offers a partial answer by calling for local faith communities to have global relationships.

But if we are really called to transform the world, which is what Matthew 25 is about, then that means change of a significant scope and scale. It will require collaboration, partnership and global vision beyond anything we’ve experienced before. If following Jesus means pursuing the kingdom of God, that’s more than humbling; it’s a God-sized challenge.

I think that’s the new age we’re entering—a new age of faith with a global vision.

 

 

 

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