Depression: A Silent Global Burden

In twenty years depression will affect more people globally than any other disease, according the World Health Organization. A BBC report points out the prevalence of the disease among the poor and those living with disabilities. The BBC says developing nations spend only 2% of their health dollars on mental health while developed nations spend 200 times more.

However, the persistence of depression in the developed world reveals how difficult it is to treat the disease successfully. In a fairly comprehensive article U.S. News says medications are effective for 30 to 40% of the depressed.

Mental health is a sensitive subject, often misunderstood worldwide. The burden of depression adds to the struggle to survive in places where hardship is daily reality. Yet it’s a silent disease, often untreated and in some areas unrecognized.

The seeds of mental health treatment are being sown in many countries where these conditions haven’t been identified before. But they are very few and of limited scope. Anyone who’s seen people traumatized by war, natural disasters or political oppression, those left vulnerable by physical disabilities and diseases, and those struggling with emotional pain of the daily grind of poverty has also seen how these external conditions exacerbate depression. In most developing nations this includes the majority of the population.

WHO’s identification of the problem is a good first step, but many more steps will be required if the projection is correct.

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