Health Care is About How we Care for Each Other

Despite all the talk about costs, the health care debate is about more than money. It’s about how we care for each other. It’s about connection and community. By connection, I mean our recognition that we are connected as a human family and in a social network. We are no stronger than our concern for the most vulnerable among us. By community, I mean the principle that has been a foundation of the democratic experiment: that in addition to individual rights, we have a mutual shared responsibility for each other and this wider social network protects and assures rights for all of us. Civic responsibility and morality. The political posturing that has marked the debate the past few weeks could not be further from this reality and that’s a national disgrace.

Many of the most vulnerable are those with chronic diseases, some of which are untreatable but for palliative care; the poor who cannot afford access; seniors of limited means; children, who by their innocence are dependent upon adults for proper treatment. In a society of abundance, yes, even in the great recession we live abundantly, the idea that we are unable to care for all our citizens is disgraceful. Health care is a measure of what we strive to be, or what we have become. It is a moral issue.

It’s deeply disturbing that living wills and advance directives have been mischaracterized as death panels. I’ve found these to be among the most helpful and comforting tools available when I’ve faced agonizing decisions for which there are no easy answers. In those difficult decisions, I’ve wanted the wishes of a loved one to be followed and the sanctity and dignity of their lives respected. I’ve not wanted others who don’t know them to impose their views or judgments upon them. That’s the value of living wills and advance directives, exactly the opposite of the description of some political operatives today.

The inaccuracies and outright misrepresentations about reform add to the concerns and emotional burden of people who are already living in a vulnerable state. The harm done by introducing the fear they will lose even more of their access to health care is too high an emotional price to pay for political maneuvering. Many have already experienced significant cuts. Fortunately, some religious leaders in the mainline denominations and progressive evangelicals see it in this way. They are speaking out and organizing. This is as it should be.

If the religious community were to remain silent on this issue of civic responsibility and morality, it would risk betraying fundamental values about the dignity of human life and the value of our connection in community. The real cost of our uncivil debate on health care and our failure to reform, is not the loss of dollars but the loss of connection and community.

3 Responses to “Health Care is About How we Care for Each Other”

  1. Francisco Litardo August 21, 2009 at 7:47 am #

    Thank you Larry. I appreciate your feelings and care for this topic. I agree with you. Thank you for voicing you opinion and continiuing to encourage greater faith-based involvement.

  2. Dan Frisby September 28, 2009 at 9:11 pm #

    Thanks, Larry! You are appreciated for your wisdom, candor and civility in matters human/spiritual! The UMC is blessed to have your heart/mind in leadership in this new century.

    I must admit you are much more courteous regarding the distractions, manipulations and deceptions regarding health care discussion than i have been on twitter. Bless you and yours always!

    • Larry September 29, 2009 at 2:02 pm #

      Thanks Dan. Wish I lived up to these kind words.
      Larry

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