Global Media–The Landscape Has Changed

The proliferation of media
outlets has changed the lenses through which audiences view the world,
especially U.S. policy and the words and deeds of leaders, according to Lawrence
Pintak, director of the Adham Center for Electronic Journalism at The American
University in Cairo.

There used
to be a
time when
the U.S.
media wrote
the global
narrative.
The world
saw itself
through
a largely
American
camera lens.
No more.

Lawrence Pintak
quoted in The
International
Herald Tribune

The U.S. media bubble has burst. Hundreds of new channels now deliver information around the globe.
The singular “narrative” once provided by U.S. media faces competition as never before.

That’s the view of Lawrence Pintak, director of the Adham Center for Electronic Journalism at The American University in Cairo. He writes in the International Herald Tribune this morning.

Pintak says viewers in the Middle East can watch more than 300 channels, each with its own perspective. Turkey, Singapore, India, Russia, China, France and Latin America have 24/7 news channels, not to mention the Internet, giving instant updates.

Pintak says a statement by an official in the U.S. can be around the world and have impact, for good or ill, within minutes. This means people not only have the information to put a story in their perspective, they also can also judge the authenticity of a statement by comparing it to actions in their region of the world.

U.S. officials can no longer say one thing and do another, according to Pintak.

“The genie is out of the bottle,” Pintak writes, and, in his view, some U.S. officials “don’t get it.”

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