Spiritual Care After a Catastrophe

A catastrophe can result in a spiritual
crisis, or it can be a time of greater strength. Mary Geaudrea, the director of
spiritual care for the United Methodist Committee on Relief discusses her recent
experience in the Gulf states and also reflects on her longterm learnings from
other disasters.

A catastrophe can result in a spiritual crisis, or it can be a time of greater strength. Mary Gaudreau, the director of spiritual care for the United Methodist Committee on Relief discusses her recent experience in the Gulf states and also reflects on her longterm learnings from other disasters.

Mary says the church provides depth and security when events de-stabilize life. She told me that people whose lives are disrupted by catastrophe need safety and security first. These, she says, are offered by “excellent theology.”

She says clergy are the spiritual life support for their communities and they will be called upon to interpret events through spiritual understanding that reaches deeper than that commonly found in the wider culture. For example, she says it’s important for affected persons to be reminded of God’s love and presence, and not to be corrected when they express questionable theology as they face catastrophic events.

Mary says an important part of the interpretation of a disrupting event is the ability of UMCOR, which enters during an emergency but stays through long-term rehabilitation, to help people see long-term recovery from the start of an emergency.

An Interview with
Mary Gaudreau


Join the conversation!

Post a reply in the form below.

Leave a Reply:

Gravatar Image