Religion and Politics

A few years ago when there was an organized left and a smaller and less organized right it was often said that religious people should stay out of politics. Religion and politics don’t mix. It was evangelical leaders who promoted this message.

They spoke out of genuine belief that faith is not something that can be contained in a political wrapper. They believed the central mission of the Christian was to make disciples, individual by individual. They were suspicious of government intervention in the affairs of religious organizations. And they felt, I suspect, marginalized in the majority culture.

Today, the situation is almost totally reversed. There really isn’t a left in the traditional sense. I think it’s a misnomer to call moderates “left.” The landscape of Cold War categories doesn’t apply to contemporary social and political realities on the ground, at least not in the United States. Those who call the leadership of the mainline churches leftist today are simply mischaracterizing those leaders, in my opinion. There is no leftist, radical voice advocating change by taking to the streets, tearing down institutions and upsetting the social order today as was the case in the sixties.

Neither are there theoretical frameworks advocating for socialism or state capitalism coming from the the left. That form of sixties radicalism has either been co-opted, marginalized or abandoned. Those who in former times would have been known as moderates or progressives are called leftists by some today, but, that doesn’t make it so. As I view the leaders I’ve seen in mainline religious groups, they don’t have a leftist agenda, nor any political agenda.

A few have called the federal budget a moral statement. Surely, that’s not a radical position. A few have called for social justice for the poor and vulnerable, but within existing public policies, and that’s not a radical position. It’s simply calling for critical review of priorities about how we expend national and state resources. I can’t figure out why this is viewed as politically unacceptable. It’s a fundamental part of the democratic process.
At most, those who advocate this position say that our values should inform our decisions about how we spend our money. That is hardly radical.

If I step back from the super-heated rhetoric of James Dobson and others who share his views, and look dispassionately at the religious landscape, I see a great moderate middle that is not prone to taking extreme positions from any direction. And if we are to believe the Barna Group’s polling over the past ten years, it confirms that there has not been significant shift in the religious landscape. Evangelicals still account for approximately 7% of the religious population, as they did ten years ago. Other groups have waxed and waned slightly, but not by precipitous change. National elections have hinged on razor thin margins. Votes in the General Conference of The United Methodist Church reveal a consistency that is tenuous at best. If a mere 10% of delegates changed their votes on some of the most contentious issues the church faces, the outcome would be very different. That’s not a church caught up in the grips of extremists on any side.

So, I see more reason to hope than to be discouraged. We need to keep hope alive. And we need to stay in dialogue

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