Wrapping Up

With this post we will take down the link between umc.org and Perspectives. I will continue to blog. Faith, communications and culture are as current as this morning’s news, so I intend to keep apace.

Thank you for stopping by this blog during my visit with the delegation to Sumatra. I hope it has been informative. I hope, further, that you feel welcome to continue to drop in.

It’s
been an insight to see the level of interest the blog generated. My estimate is
that a few thousand people have dropped in the past three weeks. (I added a
counter belatedly and 600 logged in within a couple of
days.)

Some have linked to the blog
and syndicated it. Others have responded to me in person or by e-mail. I
welcome your response, ideas and critique. This blog arises out of my own
desire to engage in conversation about how new technologies are shaping our
quality of life for better or ill. I am committed to viewing my place in the
world from a global perspective; from viewing the human community as having more
in common than in difference; and in seeing the human family as all of us
together, not as “us” and “them.”

New technologies can help us
achieve these idealistic goals, and they can make it more difficult.

Never the less, I live in the hope
that we can use media to “humanize” the global community. By that, I mean that
we can communicate so that we see the humanity of each other, understand each
other better, seek partnerships that result in higher quality of life for all
peoples and create attitudes of inclusiveness and respect for
all.

This blog is my personal
reflections and in no way reflects the official positions of The United
Methodist Church by whom I am employed. As you can read in my commentary, I
have opinions on many subjects and concerns, and I write about many of these
here. I’m also passionate about many things, and, so, I hope I write with
energy about those things.

The
visit to Sumatra was a moving, uplifting experience. The Methodist Church of
Indonesia is doing a remarkable job of relief, and so are many other committed
persons. The people of The United Methodist Church, as well as people around
the world beyond the church, have been remarkably generous in their concern. I
take great hope in this generosity and willingness to
serve.

Finally, while I have written
more about Indonesia, I’m also very aware that the needs are spread across the
southern Asia region. My concentration on Indonesia is a result of my own visit
to one area.

But the church and
the humanitarian needs are much broader than this one area. I keep this in
mind. We must not neglect people in the other regions of southern Asia, nor,
for that matter, in Africa, Latin America or the United States who face critical
need. The people of the Sudan still face urgent needs. Congo remains a tenuous
place. The bottom has fallen out of the middle class in Latin America and a
growing number of people are becoming
poorer.

If you intend to come back,
you may bookmark the blog or include it in your RSS reader. Thanks for
visiting.

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