A Trump Anti-Inauguration Plan

How does a person of faith and a concerned citizen respond to the inauguration of Donald Trump which is only days away?

The question is especially pertinent if you believe Trump is a danger to the country, if not the world, and articulates opinions and policies that are clearly in conflict with the teachings of Jesus.

Much damage has been done to the impression of Christians by white evangelicals and other Christians who voted for Trump despite his obvious moral failings, racism, misogyny, authoritarianism, ignorance of policy and global affairs.

I think it’s important to reclaim the faith from the fear and warped theology that political operatives on the right have used to infect Christian teaching.

And I’m not alone in this. A plethora of email appeals to resist, repudiate, and protest Trump’s leadership and policies come daily. What to do?

Moral Response

A moral response based on faith is not only possible, it can be a witness to the teachings of Jesus from a different perspective.

A recent column by Charles M. Blow, while not written with religion in mind, provided helpful guidance. Blow writes that it’s not enough to be negative. Negative actions must be balanced with constructive response that reinforces principles and values. 

This resonates with me. Christian faith is embodied in constructive action. Faith is a way of living. In fact, in its earliest days, it was called “the way.”

Blow proposes a personal plan for making your opposition known. He says we must also deny that Trump and his behavior are normal. Blow calls it an “anti-inauguration plan.”

Like many others, I’ve been developing my own response to the election of Trump and I find Blow’s plan a helpful tool. 

So, with appreciation to Mr. Blow for his template, here’s my plan:

Pray

Prayer is lifting to consciousness our deepest concerns, hopes, fears, and joys, and baring them before God. Prayer is not limited to petitioning God for personal favors, or blessing others.

Prayer is also about perceiving and responding to the sacred in our lives. It is active engagement.

Since I left the workplace, I have been concentrating on nature and wildlife photography, not merely as a hobby but as a form of prayer.

The meditation time this provides, the awareness of the sacred it brings to consciousness, and the sharing it allows has become more meaningful than I anticipated when I began.

I believe when we bring our creativity to expression in concrete ways, we are are engaging in a sacred conversation. 

My photography not only expresses my creative impulses, it also is a reminder to me of the sacredness of the natural world. And it’s a way to call attention to the need to preserve and protect the whole of God’s good creation.

Protest

Protests are being organized around the country. I will join those in my city who proclaim that the policies proposed by Trump and some of his cabinet selections do not represent values and policies that I endorse. Some are antithetical to civil liberties, immigrants, women, and the environment. I intend to protest these harmful policies. 

Donate

Since the election, my spouse and I have donated to four organizations that are working to conserve wildlife and natural sites, one that is assisting people to utilize sustainable technology to improve their lives, a couple that work in public policy advocacy, and one that is speaking publicly from religious values to call the Trump administration to accountability.

Subscribe

We believe that a free press, flawed as electronic journalism is, remains an important line of defense in these troubling days. While I have stopped watching television news and public affairs programming and eliminated NPR from my information-gathering habits, I have subscribed to three newspapers and a magazine rooted in Christian teachings that focuses on justice and reducing poverty .

Remember that subscriptions also open the channel to online reading of content.

Read

It’s clear that an informed public is essential to the common good. I spend less time with TV and more time reading since we now have a president who seems averse to reading much of anything of substance.

In particular, I am re-reading Jared Diamond’s Pulitzer prize winning “Collapse”, and Dr. Tex Sample’s “A Christian Theology for the Common Good.”

Write

I have made my views known to my national and state legislators in the past but since the Trump election I have been much more frequent in writing to elected representatives to advocate for public policy that I believe is more humane, just, and consistent with the Constitution and the moral imperatives that Jesus taught.

Hearing from me more often, I assume also identifies me to them and reminds them of values that I advocate.

Letters to the editor, op-ed opinion pieces, radio call-in shows, feedback to news media about stories, and outreach through social media are means to voice support for fundamental moral issues of justice.

Connect

I have sought to re-connect with family and friends because we live in a society that is isolating and destructive of community. This disintegration of community is what fed the discontent and fears of Trump voters, and he was successful in exploiting discontent and fear.

People of faith also have local communities called congregations in which they can worship and find spiritual strength, develop friendships, and study the teachings of Jesus that are the basis for a life lived with meaning and purpose.

But to be frank about it, some of these communities have not been places where honest discussion of justice and faithfulness to the common good have been addressed forthrightly. It’s time to reclaim this lost territory for religious values that are humanizing and biblically sound, to call ourselves and our religious leaders to accountability before God.

We live in a society that has broken the bonds of community. The mantra of individualism has damaged community. It is based on a doctrine that the interests of the individual are, or ought to be, ethically paramount. Taken to excess, this doctrine today fosters hyper-individualism. 

Our housing developments are not created to encourage community. Houses are made to isolate us. Our social media intercede to substitute for direct person-to-person communication. 

Hyper-individualism is in direct conflict with the call of Jesus to be self-emptying in service to others. In this way, Christian faith is counter-cultural because it calls us to be concerned for one another, especially those who live in poverty conditions and those who are vulnerable.

We are discovering that no amount of things makes up for the loss of friends and communal interaction. We must rebuild our connection with others and re-discover the call to servanthood contained in the gospel of Matthew in chapter 25.

Volunteer

There are myriad ways to volunteer to assist people in local communities, and church people are usually at the head of the line. From groups that serve disadvantaged children, abused women, immigrants, the homeless, environmental protection, to missional efforts through local churches, there are ways to engage to make for a better world and repudiate divisiveness and fear of the ‘the other.”

These are some of the ways that I see myself participating in society today and making a difference. I am motivated by my understanding of the demands of faith, and by my concern that citizenship carries the responsibility to participate in a way that supports and protects the vulnerable.

I’d be interested in hearing about yours.

Hope in a Post-truth World

In a helpful analysis of the uses of social media by the water protectors at Standing Rock, Ginny Underwood points out how social media were used to tell the story of the people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The analysis was published by United Methodist News Service, the news arm of The United Methodist Church.

Ginny points out how the water protectors used social media strategically to overcome lack of coverage by mainstream media. In doing this, she notes the people were enabled to tell their own story, something that’s been more difficult in the past because of lack of access to media controlled by others.

Key to Success

A key to the success of the resistance was the strategic use of social media to tell a story that for many weeks was not told by mainstream media. The water protectors built a movement through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social media from a remote hillside in the middle of the country far from the communication hubs of the established media.

They told a story that was easy to understand and with which anyone could identify. When dogs and rubber bullets were used by local authorities and water cannons turned on the protestors, it was on Facebook within minutes. 

Creating a Movement

Out of this communication a movement was built. A movement can defeat the establishment almost every time if it holds together and if it communicates effectively.

There are other components of this story that bear attention.

UMNS published this analysis before any other media outlet recognized the importance of the communication strategy. This is an important and appropriate role for the church’s communication arm to fulfill.

UMNS (for which I once had executive responsibility) should be an authoritative information source for the stories of those without voice, on the margins, and otherwise at a disadvantage in a media environment dominated by big money and big corporations.

It’s not a public relations function that serves on behalf of the church.

Truth-telling Rooted in the Gospel

It is the truth-teller rooted in the church’s claim of the Gospel of Jesus that the truth will set us free.

In the post-truth world of Trump, and the fact-free disinformation of fake news, the mainline religious traditions should be standing in the breach doing truth-telling and fact-finding, and enabling those who lack the capacity to tell their own stories without an assist to do so.

Mainstream electronic media, subject to the greed of corporate executives and the demand for ratings, failed us at truth telling in the past election. Don’t look for this to change.

Mainstream Fail

Mainstream religious institutions have failed and continue to fail to engage the public conversation about just treatment of people, fair wages, economic justice, humane ways to resolve conflict, and the global environmental crisis.

The mainline denominations have decimated their news services. In doing so they have removed their capacity to fulfill one of their most sacred responsibilities, to speak truth to power, and to do what Jesus asked us to do, to identify with the poor and oppressed and to raise our voice on their behalf for justice and equity.

When religious institutions fail to protect us from the principalities and powers, other means must be found. In the DAPL issue, the water protectors are playing that important role.

And it’s important that communicators like Ginny Underwood and services like United Methodist News Service fulfill their responsibilities to tell the stories of the people.

Sacred Stories, Spirit Movement

That’s because these are sacred stories. They will be overlooked by those who serve corporate masters and moneyed interests.

At this moment in global history, there may be no more important role for religious communicators than to be the story-tellers who inform us of the movement of the Spirit to protect, heal and save us from our own hubris, greed and false worship of power.

_______________________

Postscript: Faith in Public Life (FPL) is providing religious leaders with the means to speak to moral issues by providing a platform for exposure. The Rev. William Barber, for example, is an effective public voice for justice and FPL has assisted him and others with media access. I am a board member of FPL.

The Failure of TV News, Or Why I Have Given Up on TV Journalism

screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-7-57-10-pmI have watched one news program on television since the election, BBC America.

I’ve kept up wth the news through online reading and Reuters video among others.

When I started writing this post my intent was to explain why I was turning away from watching TV news. After the way television news programs handled the Trump campaign I resolved to personally boycott TV news. Given a plethora of options for information today, that’s not a radical step, I admit.

But it’s a big change me.  For most of my life I’ve been an information junkie. I’ve worked in and around TV news for most of my adult life.

I devoured newspapers and TV news programs. But, that has come to an end.

Rather than a total boycott, I’ve become a cautious skeptic, watching only to get information about those stories that I know are current and unfolding. (The fires in the Smoky Mountains are the most recent example.)

And I rely on other media for substance and perspective.

Election coverage turned me off TV news. Here’s why.

1.The willingness of TV executives to allow Trump to dominate airtime.

Trump manipulated the media and many TV journalists and program executives were willing accomplices in his manipulation. CBS President Les Moonves made a boast that was irresponsible, greedy, and lacking in civic principles when he said of Donald Trump, “It may not be good for America, but it’s damn good for CBS.”

NBC decided to put Matt Lauer, an entertainment show host, in a primetime role as host of a “candidate forum” which had the effect of mixing politics and entertainment, and subsequently blew up in Lauer’s face when he failed to fact-check Trump and shorted Sec. Clinton.

According to one study, Trump received $3 billion in free air time. This started even before he had begun to raise funds for his campaign and was invisible in the Republican primaries.

He dominated the airwaves not because he had better ideas but because his outlandish comments, media savvy, and constant availability drew an audience and made the TV networks money.

Journalism is about more than money and entertainment. It’s about providing accurate information so people can be well-informed and make considered decisions.

What we got with coverage of Trump was politics as entertainment laced with lies and extremism.

2. Unfiltered airing of Trump speeches including outrageous claims made with virtually no fact-checking until after the claims had circled the world.

Media exposure has a legitimizing effect. It’s invisible, subtle, and often denied. But I learned early in my career as a journalist that when I told the stories of people in poverty in the U.S. and the developing world, it was validating and legitimizing.

Journalism isn’t only about reporting what’s happening. 

It’s about exposure. Under certain circumstances exposure can mean a platform for presenting your ideas. It cannot be otherwise. How this is managed is crucial, and for too long in the primaries and for the early months of the election, this crucial management was treated too lightly by TV news.

By providing a platform for Trump to tell his stories unchecked to millions of people, media exposure served to legitimize extremism and bring it into the mainstream.

3. Applying euphemisms to Trump’s remarks and treating Trump as if he were a political candidate like traditional candidates of the past—as if he had a platform and vision.

The traditional journalistic practice is to present at least two opposing claims with quotes from both sides, giving each equal attention. But Trump is a liar and a demagogue. To give his conspiracy claims status equal to the policy proposals of his primary opponents, and later to Sec. Clinton, was to elevate a charlatan to respectability, and to diminish serious policy discussion.

The traditional journalism model and its business plan undermined responsible decision-making in this election. Where it will lead us is still open to question.

4. Covering the campaign as a horse race without pressing the candidates for substance.

By emphasizing polls and ignoring policy discussions, this campaign lacked vital substance. Polls over policy.

We face a global environmental crisis. We’re hearing about potential mass extinction of wildlife. But the environmental crisis, along with many other critical issues affecting us, was completely invisible during this campaign. Not one question was posed in any debate about our common environmental global future. This was irresponsibility to the maximum.

Journalists covered the election as if it were a horse race. They have done this before. In this election, however, it put us at peril.

5. The hunt for scandal.

Subjecting Sec. Clinton to a higher level of scrutiny over email practices, as if this were scandalous, not to mention a major indicator of integrity (when it was not), diverted attention from a body of historical reporting about Trump that told us exactly who he is.

Past Secretaries of State had followed the same practices as Clinton and Snopes clarified that roughly 22 million White House e-mails exchanged via private servers during the G.W. Bush administration were deleted instead of being archived in accordance with the Presidential Records Act.

The electronic media emphasis on an email scandal that wasn’t created a straw man that continued as a diversion throughout the campaign.

6. Repeating the politically generated claim that Clinton could not be trusted.

This became a self-fulfilling loop.

Jill Abramson, former executive editor of the New York Times, who has extensive experience covering the Clintons, wrote in The Guardian, that “Hillary Clinton is fundamentally honest and trustworthy.”

Such reporting, however, was not the norm. The norm was to repeat the polls that showed voters believed the trumped up claim that she was dishonest. Couple this with the on-going crudeness of Donald Trump’s “lying Hillary” mantra and the media provided a platform to undermine the integrity of Sec. Clinton.

And so, we now have President-elect Donald Trump. An idea once laughable is now a reality.

Are the media the sole reason for Trump’s election? No. But they are a significant player through the misapplication of traditional journalistic practices applied uncritically to an untraditional, dangerous, and manipulative candidate. Trump played the media, especially the television journalists.

TV executives who let greed lead them over principled civic responsibility played along. They now bear a burden that they must face as Trump threatens a free press.

There was too much stenography and too little truth-telling, too much greed and too little concern for the common good. Too much entertainment value and too little concern for policies that will shape our lives and the well-being of the world.

This is not good for America nor CBS.

There were journalists, print and electronic, who did not fall victim to the manipulation. David Fahrenthold of the Washington Post provided a lesson in investigative reporting on the Trump Foundation, for example.

But in this election, the media lost and foremost among the losers was TV news.

Adam Hamilton on How to Talk with Congregations About Controversial Issues

screen-shot-2016-10-05-at-2-27-06-pmFor faith leaders, talking with our congregations about controversial issues is very challenging — and very important. How can we provide moral leadership and address the issues that affect our communities while remaining nonpartisan and not alienating people?
I hear a lot of people struggling with these questions. Fortunately, some wise leaders have found ways to strike a balance while speaking out. Rev. Adam Hamilton of Church of the Resurrection in Leawood, Kansas, has led his ideologically diverse congregation through dialogues seeking common ground on some of the most divisive issues of the day, from gun laws to immigration.

That’s why Faith in Public Life is holding a special 1-hour clergy conference call with Rev. Hamilton next Thursday, October 13th, at 4pm Eastern. You can register here.

Please sign up here.

Rev. Hamilton will share his story of how he approached this project and talk about lessons learned. We’ll also have dialogue and Q&A.

With the 2016 election around the corner, it’s more important than ever to approach our public leadership in a spirit of boldness and wisdom, not fear. I hope you can join us!

WHAT:     A clergy conference call with Rev. Adam Hamilton, and FPL CEO Rev. Jen Butler
 
WHEN:    Thursday, October 13th, at 4PM  Eastern.

HOW:      You can register here and Faith in Public Life will send you the dial-in information.

Pursuing Beauty

We are made immortal by the contemplation of beauty–Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota

Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota

 

Over the last few weeks I’ve been asked how I achieved a particular look for photos I post on Facebook.

It’s interesting that in the digital age this question comes up often. “How did you do that?”

In my reckoning, it was not so in the age of film, despite the fact that prints from film were heavily processed. Back then the photo seemed to speak for itself. We’ve become so technologized today that we just assume a photo has been manipulated in some way.

I’ll answer the questions in the next few posts by writing about my workflow which results in the look I’m trying to capture. But there are a couple of prior steps and I don’t want to ignore them.

Photography as Prayer

For me photography is more than the sum of techniques and technical skills. It’s an experience. It’s the act of creating art.

Sometimes it’s a spiritual act.

I once produced a video on at-risk teenage Native Americans. In a class on crafts, a wise grandmother told the kids, “When you do something that’s creative and constructive, it’s a prayer. You pray with more than words. You pray when you dance, when you sing, when you work with your hands.”

Photography can be a prayer.

She also told them that they should never do creative work when they are in a bad mood because that spirit will enter into the outcome. “Even if you’re making soup for someone who is feeling bad,” she said, “you should not make that soup if you’re not in a good mood. Your bad feelings will enter into the soup and it won’t be healthy for them.”

My photography is my soup-making. It’s both an experience and the act of creating.

Creation is Beautiful

I don’t try to achieve an effect so much as to capture the beauty that I see before me, and to share it online with friends who have the same appreciation for the natural world as I have.

Often I’m awed at the simplest of things that I see; the flight of a common bird, the shape of a leaf on a tree, the shimmer of light on water. I know some think this is naive, and others mere sentimentalism.

But it’s how I feel and what I see.

Sometimes nature, especially landscapes, lead me into a meditative state. How wonder-filled is the earth that we call our Mother?

Sometimes nature is, by human judgment, cruel. We’ve seen examples. Birds of prey are graceful but merciless. They are killing machines. Large cats, muscles straining, attack the young, weak or old in a herd. It seems an unfair match.

These are pieces of the whole reality, and they challenge the perception of an idealized natural world. It’s not all beautiful sunrises and sunsets.

Never the less, it always comes back to beauty. The Creation is a beautiful thing. It nurtures us and feeds our souls.

It calls us to protect and preserve it. We need reminders of this call, and we need to visualize it.

The Hunger for Beauty

In her excellent newsletter Brainpickings, Maria Popova quotes the poet John O’Donahue on beauty. “We can slip into the Beautiful with the same ease as we slip into the seamless embrace of water; something ancient within us already trusts that this embrace will hold us,” he writes.

“The human soul is hungry for beauty,” says O’Donahue. “When we experience the Beautiful, there is a sense of homecoming.”

He goes on to say we feel most alive in the presence of the Beautiful because it meets the needs of our soul. It brings a sense of completeness and sureness, says O’Donahue.

Nature photography—birds, animals, landscapes—isn’t simply about the photos. It’s about the pursuit of beauty, about our wholeness, about coming home.

It’s a prayer.

Fledging Day Has Arrived – The Eagle Family – Final Chapter

 

(Since January 2016, I have been observing and photographing a pair of bald eagles which nested, hatched two eggs, and nurtured the eaglets. The series of photo essays on The Eagle Family can be found at these links: Part 1Part 2Part 3, Part 4.)

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (5 of 12)First flights! This is a first flight from the nest to a nearby tree. This is juvenile #1 after flying to a tree about 75 feet to the north of the nest. The young one landed on a limb, hung on for dear life, and then decided to test the limits by flapping another five or six feet to another branch.

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (6 of 12)

It discovered that balancing on a limb is more precarious than balancing on the nest. It wobbled, flapped and

 

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (7 of 12)

seemed to say, “Perhaps if I chew off a bit of this knob I can get a better grip.”

 

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (10 of 12)

Juvenile 2 is even more uncertain. It perched on the same tree as Number 1. Then it flew back to the tree where the nest is located. It landed on a branch and settled in for a spell.

 

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (8 of 12)

Number 1 followed, planning to land. But it discovered those small twigs at the top of the tree won’t hold a bird of its size.

 

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (1 of 12)

So it flew on (as there’s really no choice), circled the tree, and headed for a stand of tress a few hundred yards away. I saw it land in the treetops in a flutter of wings and leaves, too far for my camera to get a decent shot, but it  would have been an embarrassing photo anyway. No eagle would want to be seen crash landing.

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (9 of 12)

Mother eagle circled the young ones with a fish. I’m thinking she was attempting to lure them to follow her for a feeding. This is part of the training to move them from the nest as well as to begin to teach them to hunt on their own.

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (2 of 12)

After its own traumatic landing, Number 2 was not that hungry yet. It is less mature, and more insecure than its sibling.

 

 

 

 

 

It sat perched and called out to its sibling, which flew in from the treetops and landed just below. The difference between the two is very interesting. Juvenile 1 is more aggressive, coordinated and adventurous. Number 2 is smaller and rather obsequious.

 

Now that they’ve fledged they have a lot more to learn. The survival rate for young eagles is horrible. By most reliable estimates, only 1 in 10 reach adulthood, which is 5 years of age. I’m hoping these young ones are among the survivors.

The Eagle Family – Part 4

 

(Since January 2016, I have been observing and photographing a pair of bald eagles which nested, hatched two eggs, and nurtured the eaglets. The series of photo essays on The Eagle Family can be found at these links: Part 1Part 2, Part 3.)

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (3 of 12)The young eagles have grown from eaglets to juveniles, awkward and innocent, but much more eagle-like.

 

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (4 of 12)

Juvenile number 1 is most active, testing its wings in a strong breeze.

 

 

 

 

 

At times it looked as if the young ones were unsure what those long things on their sides were for, and they whacked each other as they stretched and flapped them. But they are getting the hang of it.

The Eagle Family - Part 4 (12 of 12)

Hopping from the nest to a branch nearby is one way to practice “flying.”

 

 

 

 

 

But once you get there you have to have a firm grip. Without it you could take a tumble.

The juveniles will be fledging very soon. Stay tuned.

 

The Eagle Family–Part 3

(Since January 2016, I have been observing and photographing a pair of bald eagles which nested, hatched two eggs, and nurtured the eaglets. The series of photo essays on The Eagle Family can be found at these links: Part 1Part 2.”)

 

The Eagles Part 3-6The young eagles are developing quickly. They are beginning to take on the look of more mature juveniles.

 

 

 

 

The Eagles Part 3-3

Testing the limits of the nest.

They are testing the limits of the nest as well. The first-born is more adventuresome. He/she has begun to peer over the edge of the nest and also move to a tree limb outside the nest.

 

 

 

The Eagles Part 3-2

Perching outside the nest.

It perches there before returning to the nest. I’ve read this exploration sometimes leads to a fall which, in turn, results in the first flight. Sometimes these flights are not successful and the eaglet cannot return to the nest. In such a situation the parents watch over the young bird, feed it, and wait until it gets the hang of flying and can return to the nest. I’m hoping this is not the case with these eaglets.

 

 

The Eagles Part 3-5

This morning’s meal is a fish.

The maturation of the two has been interesting. The second-born is slightly behind. Recently, father brought in a fish for the morning feed.

 

 

 

The Eagles Part 3-4

Begging to be fed.

The second-born tried to get him to feed her/him. I heard a low whimper that sounded like an animal whine.

 

 

 

 

The Eagles Part 3

Father eagle did not answer the plea and flew off, leaving it to the young ones to feed themselves.

But the father was having none of it and left the nest after dropping off the fish, leaving it to the young ones to feed themselves (which they did).

 

 

 

 

 

The Eagles Part 3-7

Male eagles are smaller than females, as you can see in this photo.

Mother and father frequently perch on the same limb near the nest and stand guard. Here you can see the difference in size between them. The female is on the right. She is much larger than the male. This is typical of most raptors.

 

The Eagle Family–Part 2

(Since January 2016, I have been observing and photographing a pair of bald eagles which nested, hatched two eggs, and nurtured the eaglets. Part 1 of a series of photo essays on The Eagle Family can be found here.)

 

Father eagle bringing a fish to the nest for the juveniles.

Father eagle bringing a fish to the nest for the juveniles.

This morning the male Bald Eagle flew in with a fish for the juveniles. These parents seem to bring fish or shore birds for the young to eat. I’ve seen no evidence of other types of prey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

"You're not eating my portion are you?"

“You’re not eating my portion are you?”

The second-born began to tear at the fish, and the first-born looked on as if to say, “You’re not eating my portion, are you?” I don’t think it has anything to be concerned about, however. The first-born was noticeably larger than the second, and was advanced in flapping its wings and practicing flying, so he/she need not fear being overtaken by the second. It came up with a feather from a past meal, but it got to the fish as well.

 

 

 

 

 

The look. It just comes naturally.

The look. It just comes naturally.

This is the first-born practicing his eagle look. He’s got it down pretty good, I think.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Eagle Family

Circling the area to make her presence known.

The female circled the nest a couple of times this morning as she guarded the area while the male hunted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A spectacular landing on a familiar perch high in a tree across the field from the nest.

A spectacular landing on a familiar perch high in a tree across the field from the nest.

She landed in a tall tree after taking perches in two other locations, perhaps to let me know she has her eye on me.

I imagine it won’t be too much longer until the first-born attempts flight. Both juveniles are flapping their wings and hopping, especially in a strong breeze. I hope to be there to see it.

The Eagle Family

The eagle nest (1 of 1)

The eagle nest from the road. (click to enlarge photos)

Driving down a one lane road in the late winter this year, Sharon noticed a bald eagle nest. It was a surprise because we were looking for another bird.

I took a few photos and resolved to come back and take more; and to see if I could get permission from the property owners to follow the nest through the hatching and fledging of the eaglets. Eventually, I was able to secure that permission.

Mother eagle on nest (1 of 1)

The mother eagle standing guard on the edge of the nest.

As a result, I’ve been able to watch the male and female eagle guard the nest against interlopers,

 

 

 

 

Male eagle vocalizing in flight (1 of 1)

The male eagle circling and vocalizing at an intruding eagle.

 

and I witnessed them chasing one away as it tried to encroach into their territory.

 

 

 

 

Eaglets in downy feathers taking a look at their new world.

Eaglets in downy feathers taking a look at their new world.

 

I’ve seen the newly hatched eaglets peek out over the edge of the nest, looking at the world for the first time.

 

 

 

 

Mother feeding eaglet (1 of 1)

The mother pulls meat from the prey and feeds the eaglets until they learn to tear it for themselves.

 

And I’ve watched them as they were being fed by their parents.

 

 

 

 

 

The eaglets outgrew their downy feathers after a few weeks, looking more eagle-like.

The eaglets outgrew their downy feathers after a few weeks, looking more eagle-like.

They’ve grown rapidly, adding more mature feathers to their downy ones.

 

 

 

 

 

The female changed course in mid-air directly above me one day. As she twisted she also flew upside down momentarily.

The female changed course in mid-air directly above me one day. As she twisted she also flew upside down momentarily.

I’ve seen the parents do aerial acrobatics, which were startling, and bring in fish and water fowl that they’ve hunted from a nearby lake and surrounding woods.

To learn their habits and flight patterns requires standing sometimes for hours waiting for something to happen.

 

 

Adults perched vocalizing (1 of 1)

The adults vocalize with a high pitched screech-like sound. It’s more comical than regal or menacing to my ear.

The adults fly to a nearby tree and perch on the same limb, often vocalizing to each other in a strange sounding screech that is almost comical coming from a bird that looks so menacing and regal.

 

 

 

Eaglet wings raised (1 of 1)

The first-born has developed noticeably more quickly than its sibling. Here he/she is flexing it wings in preparation for the day when it will fly. And that day is not long off.

 

I’ve seen how the first-born has developed more rapidly than its sibling. He/she stands in the nest and flaps her wings as it’s trying to fly.

 

 

 

 

 

Second born eaglet (1 of 1)

The second born was more reticent in taking food early on. Today it’s more active and is maturing rapidly.

The second-born is developing more slowly and is much smaller.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Male eagle on dead tree.

The male recently perched on this dead tree trunk in the morning sunlight after circling the nest and bringing in a fish for the eaglets.

I’m waiting for the first eaglet to fledge with something like the anticipation a parent has when its child takes its first step. Until then, I watch with admiration at the sight of new lives being launched and behold the beauty.

 

 

 

 

 

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